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What You Need to Know About Election Day

Photo provided by Elections Canada

This upcoming Monday, Canadians will be heading to the polls to pick who they believe will best represent them.

U Multicultural had the chance to speak with Marie-France Kenny, regional media advisor for Elections Canada.

“It’s a special election because of the pandemic so we’ve taken every security measure, safety measure to ensure safety of the public and electors but also safety of poll workers,” said Kenny.

To be eligible to vote, you must be 18 and older and a Canadian citizen. Registered voters have already received a voter information card containing necessary information like where you can vote. If you are eligible but have not received your voter information card, then you have the option of registering at your polling location when you go vote. To register, you must bring a piece of identification that clearly states who you are and your address. After completing the registration, you will be allowed to vote.

To vote, voters must go to their assigned polling station, the location of which is stated in their voter information card. Voting at a location different from what is specified on the card is not permitted.

As required by current public health orders in Manitoba, masks are mandatory at all polling stations. “Every polling station has disinfectants, all poll workers will be wearing masks,” masks will be provided to individuals without one.

Employers must give their employees time to go vote. “People are allowed three hours straight of voting,” says Kenny.

Polling stations are expected to have longer wait times and lines due to public health orders. Voters are encouraged to be patient. “That’s our priority, ensuring safety and ensuring that electors can go and vote.”
Election day is Monday, Sept. 20. Voting will start at 8:30 AM and will go on until 8:30 PM. Those who arrive after 8:30 PM will be turned away at the doors.

If you are unsure who the candidates in your riding are or their platforms, visit the Elections Canada website link below.

https://elections.ca/home.aspx

– Michael Spivak, U Multicultural

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of U Multicultural.

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