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The Indigenous Languages Series is a unique project presented by U Multicultural, focused on education for the Indigenous languages of Cree, Ojibwe and Inuktitut through stories, culture and traditions. This project is available on U Multicultural’s online platforms, Inuit Broadcasting Corporation, First Peoples Radio Inc., and Shaw Spotlight.

– The project is funded by the Government of Canada through the Department of Canadian Heritage and distributed across Canada with help from the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation First Peoples Radio Inc., and Muskrat Magazine.

CREE LANGUAGE

Explore Cree through video, audio, and articles

OJIBWE LANGUAGE

Explore Ojibwe through video, audio, and articles

INUKTITUT LANGUAGE

Explore Inuktitut through video, audio, and articles

Meet our Indigenous speakers

Lisa Muswagon

Lisa Muswagon is a member of the Pimicikamak Cree Nation, also known as Cross Lake in Northern Manitoba. She is Nakoda Cree and grew up in northern Manitoba, the Interlake, and Winnipeg.

Her parents, Isabel and Charles, raised Lisa and her siblings in ceremonies and with traditions. She picked up the hand drum to pass on the legacy of storytelling. She is on the path of breaking cycles and is learning Cree to teach it to the next generation.

CREE LANGUAGE

Learn the basics of the Cree language with Lisa Muswagon.

Isabel Scribe

Isabel Scribe is a member of the Pimicikamak Cree Nation, also known as Cross Lake in Northern Manitoba. Isabel is a fluent speaker of the Swampy Cree language.

She and her husband, Charles, raised their children in ceremonies and with traditions. Isabel provides culturally responsive counselling, therapy, Indigenous ceremonies, and empowerment through storytelling, workshops, and sharing circles.

CREE LANGUAGE

Learn the basics of the Cree language with Isabel Scribe.

Mabel Horton

Mabel Horton is from the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation in Nelson House, Manitoba. She is fluent in the Rocky Cree, learning it from her parents, grandparents, aunties, and uncles. 

Cree and other Indigenous languages were greatly impeded and almost irradicated through the Canadian Residential School System. However, there are efforts to reclaim the language, and Mabel has seen a drive in younger generations to connect with their roots.

CREE LANGUAGE

Learn the basics of the Cree language with Mabel Horton

Robert Maytwayashing

Robert Maytwayashing is Anishinaabe, raised in his people on the Lake Manitoba First Nation in Manitoba’s Interlake Region. Robert is a pipe carrier and sweat lodge keeper. He also attends the annual ceremony of Sundance and has hosted Warrior lodges and Eagle dances.

Over the years, Robert has served his community as a Council member and Chief. He was also a Health Director in two First Nation communities and the Senior Health Policy Analyst for the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs.

OJIBWE LANGUAGE

Learn the basics of the Ojibwe language with Robert Maytwayashing

Mary Maytwayashing

Mary Maytwayashing, Strong Standing Golden Eagle, is from Lake Manitoba First Nations, also known as Dog Creek. She is a mother of three children and a grandmother of eleven. She is fluent in her language of Anishinaabemowin, which is spiritual and sacred to her people.

OJIBWE LANGUAGE

Learn the basics of the Ojibwe language with Mary Maytwayashing.

Nagamoodaa!

Upbeat and catchy songs are helping youth learn the Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe) language. Sherri, Joy, and Dave share their stories and language-learning journeys through Nagamoodaa!

OJIBWE LANGUAGE

Learn the bastings of the Ojibwe Language with Nagamoodaa!

MARTHA PEET

Martha Peet was born in an igloo in Taloyoak, where only four other families lived. Martha grew up with parents who were closely tied to the land. Her parents were “nomads” and found it difficult to stay in one place for a long time. As a result, she grew up travelling with them by dog sled.

She is a freelance interpreter, translator, and author of the Inuktitut Pocket Book.

INUKTITUT LANGUAGE

Learn the basics of the Inuktitut language with Martha Peet. 

Cameron Adams

Cameron Adams is a 5th-year Integrated Education student in the Faculty of Education at the University of Winnipeg. Cameron is ininiw-Anishinaabe and French-Canadian with Scottish and English ancestry from Gimli, Manitoba and Treaty from Memewiziibiing (Berens River), situated in Treaty 5 Territory. For the last decade, Cameron has been learning about his ancestral roots.

CREE LANGUAGE

Explore the Cree language with Cameron Adams.

Chance Paupanakis

Chance Paupanakis is a proud Swampy Cree Two-Spirit person from the Kinosew Sipi Cree Nation in Treaty 5 territory. He has worked in the Indigenous cultural and language revitalization sector for almost five years.

Other areas of activism he focuses on are Two-Spirit resurgence, land and water preservation and MMIWG2S (murdered and missing Indigenous women girls and two-spirit) advocacy. Chance is passionate about working towards a better and brighter future for First Nation peoples.

CREE LANGUAGE

Explore the Cree language with Chance Paupanakis.

Dave Bird

Dave Bird is part of the titular trio that makes up Nagamoodaa, music helping youth learn the Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe) language. Dave, wanting to learn more about his language, took part in an Ojbiwe Language program at Red River College, which is where he met the other members of Nagamoodaa.

OjibweLANGUAGE

Explore the Ojibwe language with Dave Bird.

Denise McGillvary

Denise McGillivray is a Cree Indigenous woman, mother and grandmother out of Opaskwayak Cree Nation in Treaty 5 territory. Swampy Cree is the dialect in her community.

She has been an urbanized Indigenous person for about 25 years. During that time, she has learned and understood Indigenous culture from many different perspectives and respectfully utilizes and shares what she has learned with her children and grandchildren.

CREE LANGUAGE

Explore the Cree language with Denise McGillvary.

Joy Phillips

Joy Phillips is from Hollow Water First Nation. Joy, Sherri, and Dave comprise Nagamoodaa, a musical group teaching and learning the Ojibwe language through music.

After working at Wanipigow school for one year after obtaining her degree in education, she would later take a language program at Red River College, which became the genesis for Nagamoodaa.

OJIBWE LANGUAGE

Explore the Ojibwe language with Joy Phillips.

Lisa Muswagon and Isabel Scribe

Isabel Scribe and Lisa Muswagon are members of the Pimicikamak Cree Nation, also known as Cross Lake in Northern Manitoba.

CREE LANGUAGE

Explore the Cree Language with Lisa and Isabel.

Martha Peet

Martha Peet was born in an igloo in Taloyoak, where only four other families lived. Martha grew up with parents who were closely tied to the land. Her parents were “nomads” and found it difficult to stay in one place for a long time. As a result, she grew up travelling with them by dog sled.

She is a freelance interpreter, translator, and author of the Inuktitut Pocket Book.

INUKTITUT LANGUAGE

Explore the Inuktitut language Martha Peet.

Mary Maytwayashing

Mary Maytwayashing, Strong Standing Golden Eagle, is from Lake Manitoba First Nations, also known as Dog Creek. She is a mother of three children and a grandmother of eleven. She is fluent in her language of Anishinaabemowin, which is spiritual and sacred to her people.

OJIBWE LANGUAGE

Explore the Ojibwe language with Mary Maytwayashing

Sherri Shorting

Upbeat and catchy songs are helping youth learn the Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe) language. Sherri, Joy, and Dave share their stories and language-learning journeys through Nagamoodaa!

OJIBWE LANGUAGE

Explore the Ojibwe language with Sherri Shorting

Adrienne Huard

Adrienne Huard of the turtle clan is a Two-Spirit/Indigiqueer Anishinaabe whose father’s family hails from Couchiching First Nation, Treaty 3 territory in Ontario. Learning Anishinaabemowin has helped Huard further understand their identity as Two-Spirit and the significance of Two-Spirit within Indigenous culture.

OJIBWE LANGUAGE

Explore the Ojibwe language with Adrienne Huard in their article: Niizh Manidoog Ndaayaawaag.

Isabel Scribe

Isabel Scribe is a member of the Pimicikamak Cree Nation, also known as Cross Lake in Northern Manitoba. Isabel is a fluent speaker of the Swampy Cree language.

She and her husband, Charles, raised their children in ceremonies and with traditions. Isabel provides culturally responsive counselling, therapy, Indigenous ceremonies, and empowerment through storytelling, workshops, and sharing circles.

CREE LANGUAGE

Explore the Cree language with Isabel Scribe through her article: All Nations Gather Under the Sacred Tree of Life.

Kimberly Halcrow

Kimberly Halcrow is a Cree woman originally from Norway House and now lives in Gilliam, Manitoba, teaching Cree to children from nursery to grade six. She speaks the N dialect, also known as Swampy Cree.

Halcrow never anticipated becoming a teacher, but she has learned so much about herself and her language, teaching it to others.

Kate Whiteford

Kate Whitford, Golden Eagle Woman, is of the bear clan. From Sandy Bay First Nation, she was the oldest of 12 children born to her parents, Joseph and Sarah. Her parents and grandparents were my first teachers, learning language and the seven sacred teachings of Respect, Love, Wisdom, Bravery, Truth, Honesty, and Humility.

OJIBWE LANGUAGE

Explore the Ojibwe language with Kate Whiteford in their article: The Life Of An Anishinaabek Woman.

Mary Maytwayashing

Mary Maytwayashing, Strong Standing Golden Eagle, is from Lake Manitoba First Nations, also known as Dog Creek. She is a mother of three children and a grandmother of eleven. She is fluent in her language of Anishinaabemowin, which is spiritual and sacred to her people.

OJIBWE LANGUAGE

Explore the Ojibwe language with Mary Maytwayashing in her articles: Anishinaabemowin Is The Language Of My Ancestors, and We Had A Good Life.

Martha Peet

Martha Peet was born in an igloo in Taloyoak, where only four other families lived. Martha grew up with parents who were closely tied to the land. Her parents were “nomads” and found it difficult to stay in one place for a long time. As a result, she grew up travelling with them by dog sled.

She is a freelance interpreter, translator, and author of the Inuktitut Pocket Book.

INUKTITUT LANGUAGE

Explore the Inuktitut language with Martha Peet through her article: The Inuit Way of Life.

Dr. Norma Dunning

Dr. Norma Dunning is an author, researcher, professor, a mother of three sons, and a grandmother of four.

Dr. Dunning teaches many Indigenous youth, and they often speak of how they are not fluent in what should have been their mother tongue. This disheartens her as, from her perspective, being Indigenous is more than fluency in a language; it’s an embrace of heritage, culture, and living life with respect and honour.

INUKTITUT LANGUAGE

Explore the Inuktitut language with Dr. Norma Dunning through her articles: Anti-Racism, Seek It, Harvest It, Own It!, We Are More Than A Language, and You Are Indigenous No Matter Where You Stand.

Robert Maytwayashing

Robert Maytwayashing is Anishinaabe, raised in his people on the Lake Manitoba First Nation in Manitoba’s Interlake Region. Robert is a pipe carrier and sweat lodge keeper. He also attends the annual ceremony of Sundance and has hosted Warrior lodges and Eagle dances.

Over the years, Robert has served his community as a Council member and Chief. He was also a Health Director in two First Nation communities and the Senior Health Policy Analyst for the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs.

OJIBWE LANGUAGE

Explore the Ojibwe language with Robert Maytwayashing through his article: Anishinabaemowin, The Language Of The Anishinaabae.

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